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Sat, 4 Aug , 2018 Reply (Protected) Modify (Protected) Remove (Protected)


Kate Sweeny kate.sweeny@yahoo.com
Yorkshire

Hello Mr MacLaverty. I'm happy to see that you look at this site on occasion. I
wanted to report that our book group (10 strong, been going for 14 years) read
Midwinter Break and discussed it last night. It's extremely rare for us all to agree
about a book, but we all found this one absolutely beautiful. We agreed that the
characters were sensitively drawn, sympathetic and believable. We really hope that
Gerry manages to stay off the booze, at least sufficiently for Stella to stay with
him.....maybe scope for a sequel?

Tue, 17 Jul , 2018 Reply (Protected) Modify (Protected) Remove (Protected)


james kelly james.kelly@ul.ie
Rep. Ireland

Hi Bernard,

just to let you know that I have just finished Midwinter Break and found it a brilliant
read(total page turner) I was hooked from the second paragraph.
I've started Cal but I saw Lamb a while back.
regarding Midwinter break if i could ask you the significance of the Ice? otherwise
looking forward to your next piece of work( hopefully we won't have to wait too long)
best,
James

Wed, 16 May , 2018 Reply (Protected) Modify (Protected) Remove (Protected)


Patrick Kelly patrickkelly1@hotmail.co.uk
York

Hi
I just wanted to say that I have been reading your short story collection and I think
'Walking the Dog' is possibly the best thing I have seen on the Troubles in Northern
Ireland. It is concise, moving and gets right to the heart of the madness of
sectarianism. Should be on the school curriculum.

Sun, 29 Apr , 2018 Reply (Protected) Modify (Protected) Remove (Protected)


laura nolan laurahoppe@gmx.de
hamburg

Midwinter Break was, to quote my book mad dad, a cracker!
I loved it, especially the way a different location acts to buffer the pasr and the present.
So much to think about,.
I love the way Stella and Gerry are forever having little naps. Mini-breaks are often an
exhausting business. Thanks ,

Thu, 26 Apr , 2018 Reply (Protected) Modify (Protected) Remove (Protected)


Susan Browning susanjbrowning@aol.co.uk
Manchester UK

I’m a student on a creative writing MA. I read Midwinter Break in one sitting, staying up
until nearly 3am to finish it. Your writing is beautiful, so poignant. I empathised with both
characters. This is the first book I’ve read of yours, so I’m thrilled to be able to read
more. Thank you

Sun, 25 Mar , 2018 Modify (Protected) Remove (Protected)


Good luck, Susan, with the MA. And good luck with my fiction from the past.
Patricia Watson Patrosswatson@gmail.com
Providence, Rhode Island

I loved Midwinter Break. I read it in one
sitting. Thank you for such a lovely
story.

Sun, 11 Mar , 2018 Modify (Protected) Remove (Protected)


Thank you for saying so

Bernard

Leigh Hudgens leighhudgens@yahoo.ie
Cork Ireland

Hi Bernard. I am in a book club and have been assigned the task of doing a
presentation of your book Midwinter Break. I would appreciate any insight that you
feel would be of value for discussion. We have been meeting for over 40 years and
I am one of the newest members since I joined in 1982 when I moved to Ireland. I
enjoyed your character development and questioned who loved more Christian or
alcoholic. You raised many issues that I am sure will lead to a lively discussion.
Thank you for input you are willing to share.

Mon, 5 Feb , 2018 Modify (Protected) Remove (Protected)


Leigh Hudgens,

Thanks for your posting. I hesitate to launch into a rumination on my own novel in such a place. It is what it is. The characters are who they are. I wish you and your book club all the best with your discussion.

I liked Elizabeth Strouts observation in her novel My Name is Lucy Barton when she has her fictional writer, Sarah Payne, say that her job as a writer of fiction is to report on the human condition, to tell us who we are and what we think and what we do.

Janie Hampton janie@janiehampton.co.uk
A loft in Cornwall

Mid winter break was a Christmas present from my husband of46 years( our marraige.
not his age). I don't think he realised what an apposite choice it was. When he's read it
too we will see who he identifies with most. I expect it'll be the wife. Which isn't fair
because i do too. Since Xmas day Ive been holed up in an onion loft with a snivelly
cold, just dozing and reading. At night the corrugated roof creaks and shivers in the
wind. To avoid my germs, Husband has retreated to the sofa downstairs with the dog
and it's farts. We'll probably survive another year. Thank you and Happy New year to
you.

Thu, 28 Dec , 2017 Modify (Protected) Remove (Protected)


Janie,
What a great comment - a short story in itself. The very thought of being aloft in Cornwall in such a situation. Thank you. I thoroughly enjoyed reading it.Seeing it. Smelling it.

Amy Curran amy.e.curran@outlook.com
Glasgow

Hi Bernard,
I am a fellow English teacher in
Glasgow and I'm teaching More Than
Just the Disease to my Nat 5 class this
year (because I studied it for Higher
myself and enjoyed it).

Could you direct me to a suitable link
for the movie for MTJTD? I have
Googled endlessly and cannot find a
single reference to this film.

Thanks in advance!

Tue, 5 Dec , 2017 Modify (Protected) Remove (Protected)


Dear Amy,

Thanks for teaching More than Just the Disease.
I wrote a TV play of the story but not wanting to use the word Disease in the title I called it 'Sometime in August'. It was produced by BBC Scotland in 1989. Hope this is of some help in tracking it down.
All the best to you.